C1841

Trigonometrical Survey of the Country at Moreton Bay.

Mapmaker:

Robert Dixon (1800 - 1858)

Very detailed map by Robert Dixon of Moreton Bay made only three years after the area was opened up to free settlers in 1842. Dixon had begun surveys of the area in 1839 with his assistant surveyors Granville Stapylton and … Read Full Description

$A 2,750

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S/N: PRHC-AM-QC-002–188271
(RW02-B)
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Details

Full Title:

Trigonometrical Survey of the Country at Moreton Bay.

Date:

C1841

Mapmaker:

Robert Dixon (1800 - 1858)

Engraver:

John Arrowsmith 
(1790 – 
1837)

Condition:

Small repaired tear at left sheet edge along fold, otherwise in good condition. Laid onto archival linen, with folds as issued.

Technique:

Lithograph with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

460mm 
x 585mm
AUTHENTICITY
Trigonometrical Survey of the Country at Moreton Bay. - Antique Map from 1841

Genuine antique
dated:

1841

Description:

Very detailed map by Robert Dixon of Moreton Bay made only three years after the area was opened up to free settlers in 1842.

Dixon had begun surveys of the area in 1839 with his assistant surveyors Granville Stapylton and James Warner, began a trigonometrical survey of Moreton Bay for the Government. He was instructed to compile a plan of the district for land sales and town reserves. In January 1840, Dixon was promoted to surveyor in charge of the Moreton Bay district, but was suspended after an altercation with Lieutenant Gorman, commandant of the penal establishment.

From, “Copy of a Dispatch from Sir.Gipps, Governor of New South Wales to the Secretary of the State for the Colonies. Ordered, by the House of Commons, to be Printed, 9 March 1841.

Mapmaker:

Robert Dixon (1800-1858)

Dixon was a surveyor and explorer, born Durham, England. He arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in May 1821 on the Westmoreland with his brother George. For two years they were employed by Edward Lord, in charge of his extensive stockyards. In 1823 each brother was granted 100 acres in the valley of the River Clyde and in 1824 each received an additional 200 acres (81 ha).

In July 1826 Robert Dixon sold out to his brother and went to Sydney, where in September he was appointed assistant surveyor in the Surveyor-General’s Department under Lieutenant John Oxley. Dixon played an outstanding part in extending geographical knowledge in New South Wales, and many of his surveys were performed under trying and
hazardous conditions. He ranks high among early surveyors and explorers.

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