C1561

Carta Marina Nuova Tavola.

This is the rare first state of Ruscelli&#8217s world map included in his translation of Ptolemy&#8217s Geographia, printed by Vincenzo Valgrisi. It features a stipple engraved sea and numerous rhumb lines radiating from seventeen focal points. The map is based … Read Full Description

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S/N: RUSC-WM-1561–184136
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Details

Full Title:

Carta Marina Nuova Tavola.

Date:

C1561

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

244mm 
x 180mm
AUTHENTICITY
Carta Marina Nuova Tavola. - Antique Map from 1561

Genuine antique
dated:

1561

Description:

This is the rare first state of Ruscelli&#8217s world map included in his translation of Ptolemy&#8217s Geographia, printed by Vincenzo Valgrisi. It features a stipple engraved sea and numerous rhumb lines radiating from seventeen focal points. The map is based on Gastaldi&#8217s world map of 1548 which he designed for use in maritime navigation and was engraved by Giulio and Livio Sanuto. The map contains only minimal interior detail but includes several important ports and trading posts including, Zanzibar on the east coast of Africa and Cambay, one of India&#8217s two main ocean ports, visited by Marco Polo in 1293. The Magellan Strait, at the southern tip of South America is labelled and Tierra del Fuego is shown as a very large island. Curiously, the large southern continent of Terra Australis Incognita that appears in other maps of the period is not depicted. The map records the changing nature of cartography in the sixteenth century as mapmakers began to escape the influence of Ptolemy&#8217s Geographia which had been the main source of geographical knowledge for some 1,500 years. Gilolo, the largest island in the Moluccas (Spice Islands) is shown, although incorrectly positioned. After the signing of the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494, Spain and Portugal agreed that all newly discovered lands to the east of the Cape Verde Islands belonged to Portugal and those to the west to Spain. Initially, the &#8216line&#8217 did not encircle the world but after Portugal discovered the Moluccas in 1512, which were the only sources of nutmeg and cloves in the world, Spain claimed that the islands fell within their hemisphere. The issue was settled with the Treaty of Zaragoza in 1529 with Spain agreeing to relinquish its claim to the islands for a payment of 350,000 ducats by Portugal. From Ruscelli&#8217s La Geografia de Claudio Tolomeo Venice. References: Burden p.34, Schilder p.123, Shirley 111, pl.95, Stevens p.50, Suarez (A) p.130.

Girolamo Ruscelli (1504 - 1566)

Ruscelli was an Italian Alchemist, physician and cartographer, born around 1504 in Viterbo. He revised the Ptolemy Geography, which was issued 1561 until 1599 in Venice. The new copper engraved maps are based on Gastaldi's edition of 1548. He died in 1566 in Venice.

View other items by Girolamo Ruscelli

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