C1742

Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars V.

Fabulous celestial chart by Johann Dopplemayr (1677-1750) from his famous star atlas, Atlas Coelestis in quo Mundus Spectabilis. This chart is one of six star charts that used a gnomonic projection with geocentric orientation from Dopplemayr’s, theAtlas Coelestis. From Dopplemayr, … Read Full Description

$A 1,750

S/N: DACOEL-005-CEL–410779
(RW06)
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Details

Full Title:

Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars V.

Date:

C1742

Engraver:

 

Condition:

In good condition, with centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Hand coloured copper engraving.

Image Size: 

580mm 
x 486mm

Paper Size: 

600mm 
x 529mm
AUTHENTICITY
Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars V. - Antique Map from 1742

Genuine antique
dated:

1742

Description:

Fabulous celestial chart by Johann Dopplemayr (1677-1750) from his famous star atlas, Atlas Coelestis in quo Mundus Spectabilis.

This chart is one of six star charts that used a gnomonic projection with geocentric orientation from Dopplemayr’s, theAtlas Coelestis.

From Dopplemayr, Johann Gabriel. Atlas Coelestis in quo Mundus Spectabilis, published by Johann Baptist Homann (1663 – 1724).

 

References:
Kanas, N. Star Maps History, Artistry, and Cartography. San Francisco 2009: p.209-211.

Johann Baptist Homann (1663 - 1724)

Homann was the most important German cartographer of the 18th century. In 1715 the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the VI, appointed him Imperial Cartographer and in the same year he was also appointed a member of the Royal Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Upon his death, the business passed to his son Johann Christolph (1701-1730) and in 1730 the business was continued by the Heirs to Homann up until 1848.

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Johann Doppelmayr (1677 - 1750)

Doppelmayr was born in Nuremberg, the son of a merchant who also had an interest in science. He studied at the Aegigien Gymnasium in Nuremberg from 1689 to 1696. After graduating, he attended the University of Altdorf, where his studied law, mathematics, and natural philosophy from 1696 to 1699. He continued his studies in mathematics and physics at the University of Halle until 1700, when he began a two-year period of travel in Germany, Holland, and England. During this time he also learned to speak French, Italian and English. He also studied astronomy and learned to grind and figure his own telescope lenses. In August 1702 he returned to Nuremberg, and in 1704 was appointed Professor of Mathematics at his alma mater, the Aegigien Gymnasium, where he remained the rest of his life. He wrote on a number of topics, including astronomy, geography, spherical trigonometry, and scientific instruments. He also collaborated in the production of terrestrial and celestial globes. He was a member of several scientific societies, including; The Royal Society of London, Berlin and St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences.

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